Archive for » March, 2009 «

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 | Author:

For those who don’t yet know what its about!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddO9idmax0o[/youtube]

And then we get to make fun of it too!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN2HAroA12w[/youtube]

Oh ‘n I figured out how to add videos painlessly. W00T

Deel
Maandag, March 30th, 2009 | Author:

Who’d have thought that something as silly as Choqok trying to automatically log into Twitter might get me temporarily locked out?

Oh well. I’m patient.

Tried to log in too many times?

We've temporarily locked your account after too many failed attempts to sign in. Please chillax for a few, then try again.

Deel
Saturday, March 28th, 2009 | Author:

Its amazing how much you can do by combining the small yet powerful commands Unix has available.

This little-used command, time, finally became useful today as a way to report the length of time that certain automated operations are running. In my example, I’m timing how long it takes to build the Linux kernel:

$ time rebuild-kernel26
...
couple-thousand-lines-of-scrolling-text
...
==> Finished making: kernel26 2.6.28.8-1 x86_64 (Sat Mar 28 17:19:52 SAST 2009)
real    62m21.994s
user    43m31.846s
sys     6m1.096s

Yup, that took a little over an hour to build. The values are:

  • realthe actual time elapsed while the command was running – 62 minutes
  • userthe amount of userland time the command used – 43 minutes
  • systhe amount of system time the command used – 6 minutes

(I was busy doing other things while this was happening which is why it took 62 minutes for the desktop to do (43+6=) 49 minutes-worth of work)

If you’re using the GNU version (most likely), it also gives you the option of displaying the results in a custom fashion. Mostly, this command could be useful in scripts where you need to report how long a task tookor maybe? just a geeky way to time something random. 😛

Deel
Kategorie: linux  | Tags: , , , , , , ,  | Laat 'n boodskap
Thursday, March 26th, 2009 | Author:

Have you previously realised that www is redundant? If so, I’m preaching to the converted and you can run along back to whatever you were busy with. 😉 Otherwise, stand to attention, soldier!

begin rantish text:

When I’m browsing the web, I’d much less prefer to typewww.xkcd.comthanxkcd.com”. Reason being that if *every* site has to have w’s, what’s the point of the w’s? Not to mention that they’re a bitch to pronounce. There’s 9 syllables in there! You could almost halve that by sayingtriple-w”. I’ve heard people saydub dub dub”. Bleh. Even the World Wide Web Consortium prefers to call themselvesW3C”.

So what exactly is (was?) the point of the www? There might be more to it, however the gist of it appears to be that when Tim Berners-Lee first created the hypertext document retrieval system, he called itWorld Wide Web”. I believe that www became a standard not because it made sense or because it was a good idea, but because it was hyped far beyond the healthy respect it deserved.

Your web browser *knows* you’re dealing with web content solely by the fact that there’s an http:// in front of the url. Therefore I submit, the www is redundant.

Need more convincing?

Search engines see www.dogma.swiftspirit.co.za and dogma.swiftspirit.co.za as 2 separate web sites. Because both sites have identical content, search engines might lower your Search Rankings. Hell, you’d be competing against yourself for rankings. Silly example: instead of 3rd, you might be 5th en 7th. For this reason, it is better to either force www or to force no www. I’m in favour of the latter.

If you browse to http://www.dogma.swiftspirit.co.za/ you will be redirected to http://dogma.swiftspirit.co.za/. Even if you go to the downloads directory of my main domain with a www, you’ll be redirected appropriately. Importantly, search engines will only find one copy of my web site, nie 2. And in the long run, I’ll be wearing out my w key a li’l less. 🙂

With the possible exception of a few quick deaths, no w’s were hurt during the production of this post.

Deel
Woensdag, March 25th, 2009 | Author:

I finally got Ignite RealtimeSe Spark to work. I don’t particularly like Sparkits a necessity though and I’m sure others have had trouble with it.

As some readers might be aware, I’m using 64-bit Arch Linux. Spark runs on top of a JRE, independent of the base platform. Therefore, this shouldn’t be an issue. Egter, Spark appears to come bundled with a 32-bit JRE.

After a lot of hassle, I eventually figured all I had to do was obscure or remove (rename or delete) the bundled JRE. This way, Spark’s startup script wouldn’t find the bundled JRE and it would be forced to search for the one built into the system. I had previously installed openjdk, an open source JRE from Arch’s [ekstra] repository.

There also happens to be a minor bug in the startup script in that its looking for a folder called “vensters” when there’s clearly no such folder except one named “linux”. Go figure.

Anyway, here’s the gist of the installation if you’re doing it manually on 64bit en you already have a JRE (such as openjdk) installed for your system:

mkdir -p ~/src
cd ~/src
wget http://download.igniterealtime.org/spark/spark_2_5_8.tar.gz
tar -zxvf spark_2_5_8.tar.gz
mv Spark/jre Spark/jre.not
sed -i 's/\/lib\/windows/\/lib\/linux/g' Spark/Spark
sudo mkdir -p /opt
sudo mv Spark /opt
Deel